Monthly Archives: July 2018

Malouf to leave Michelin-starred Petersham

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Australian chef Greg Malouf has parted ways with Petersham Nurseries Cafe in Richmond, England – the shabby-chic restaurant that recently retained its Michelin-star status under Malouf’s guiding hands.
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Petersham Nurseries, a favourite among London’s celebrity set, rose to acclaim under the stewardship of another Australian chef, Skye Gyngell.

A spokeswoman for Petersham Nurseries Cafe has been quoted on caterersearch南京夜网 saying that the cafe was searching for a new “guest chef” to take over from Malouf, implying his appointment this year was only ever temporary.

Gyngell departed in controversial circumstances in February after telling Good Week-end that the awarding of a Michelin star had made working at Petersham unbearable because it gave rise to unrealistic expectations among diners. Malouf, then based in Australia, was appointed by owners Gael and Francesco Boglione as consultant chef following her departure.

Malouf had previously formed a relationship with Petersham and the Bogliones, having launched one of his acclaimed books at the cafe and having worked there occasionally as a guest chef.

Malouf has made many changes at Petersham in his short stint there, overhauling Gyngell’s kitchen staff and installing four Melburnians; Catherine Ashton (head chef), Lucia Corbel (sous chef), Tom Sarafian (senior chef de parte) and Liana Crothers (chef de parte) and slowly introducing his signature Middle Eastern flavours to the menu. At the beginning of October Petersham Nurseries Cafe retained it’s Michelin star, with editor of the British guide telling The Age the transition between Gyngell and Malouf had been seamless and that Malouf had put his stamp on the menu.

While in Melbourne last month Malouf told The Age he was in contract negotiations to stay on at the cafe. He said a sticking point was not money, but whether or not he would be granted enough time away from Petersham to make frequent return trips to Australia, where his wife Chalice and her children are based. Malouf is also working on two more books – a cookbook and a travel book – with former wife Lucy Malouf for publisher Hardie Grant. He also said he saw his role at Petersham as a stepping stone and that he would like to open his own restaurant in London in coming years.

However, a spokeswoman for Petersham Nurseries Cafe has been reported as saying yesterday that Malouf’s appointment was only ever intended as short-term. “Greg was booked as a guest chef consultant to cover the spring and summer period, a role that he completed with great success,” said the spokeswoman.

“The owners, the Boglione family, are very happy with the kitchen team at Petersham all of whom have benefited enormously from the experience of Greg’s guest tenure. Petersham is planning to repeat the experience with a different chef and will announce details in due course.”

The Age has attempted to contact Malouf, who is credited with introducing Middle Eastern flavours to Melbourne’s dining scene during his long and successful stints at restaurants MoMo and O’Connell’s.

Meanwhile Melbourne-based chefs have already begun hailing news of his return. Shane Delia from Maha, routinely characterised as having been influenced by Malouf, tweeted last night that it would be great to have Malouf back in Australia and that he was happy to hand back the Middle Eastern crown.

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8 places not to visit alone

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By all means, visit Egypt – but if you’re a woman, it might not be so much fun on your own.OK, don’t get all huffy. You can go to these places alone if you want to. I’m sure plenty of people do. Actually, I know it.
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But what I’m saying is that there are some cities and countries around the world that are better to experience with company.

Some are more fun with friends. Others are safer with company. Others are just designed for couples.

Regardless of the reason, if you’re heading to any of these places, it might not be a bad idea to talk someone into coming along with you.

Queenstown is party town. The restaurants are great, and the bars are even better. Many a ski day has been skipped at Coronet and the Remarkables due to a Queenstown-induced hangover. But if you head to the Kiwi adventure town on your own there’s every chance you’ll miss out on that completely, especially if you don’t stay in a hostel (and thus have less chance of meeting like-minded solo travellers). I was even told by one restaurant that they don’t do tables for one. I’ll just eat in my room, shall I?

I love Moscow – absolutely love it. But the Russians can be tough nuts to crack. They’re not the sort of people to immediately take a stranger under their wing. What that means is that if you’re travelling solo, it’s unlikely that you’ll make many local friends, especially when you throw in the language barrier. Take a buddy of your own, however, and you’ve at least got someone to talk to. And get a smile from occasionally.

This is like Queenstown, but times 10. Visiting Las Vegas without a friend would be about as much fun as visiting Alaska without a jumper. Unless you count the sad sacks playing the pokies on their own all day, no one seems to go to Vegas without some company to get a little crazy with. We’re talking pool parties, nightclubs, go-kart races and shooting ranges. Vegas is about letting loose – and that’s not much fun to do alone, is it?

There’s an unfortunate little caveat to this one: while the political climate is not the best right now for anyone to be travelling Egypt alone, it’s particularly bad for solo female travellers. It’s the constant hassle you get – the sort of behaviour that’s borne of the seemingly widely held belief in Egypt that Western women don’t need to be treated with the respect afforded locals. Maybe I’m wrong (I haven’t experienced it, for obvious reasons), but Egypt looks a tough one for solo women to me.

Italy is a country designed for sharing. It’s about sharing food. It’s about sharing drinks. It’s about sharing time with family and friends. There’s nothing wrong with visiting Italy alone, but you do get the feeling that this is an experience that would be far better with company – someone with which to make la dolce vita even sweeter. Otherwise you end up drinking a lot of wine alone (although that’s possibly just me).

It’s like a combination of Queenstown and Italy – a party town with great food and wine that should really be experienced with company, whether that’s good friends or a partner. This isn’t a place of particularly good museums or interesting monuments. It’s all about eating and drinking, so unless you particularly fancy the idea of standing around in a packed bar yelling, “How good is this food!” at no one in particular, don’t try to fly solo in San Seb.

These Pacific islands are stunningly beautiful, endlessly romantic, and just the sort of place you’d like to take your significant other to. And that’s what people do. Most of them, in fact. Perhaps aided by the fact that this isn’t a destination in the price range of most dirty backpackers, French Polynesia is littered with sickeningly happy couples getting their smooch on, and little else. Do yourself a favour: take someone with you.

A few people on Twitter helped me out with this one, as I haven’t actually been. But PNG, by all accounts, is a scary place (the cities, that is – I’d jump at the chance to visit the outer islands for some of the world’s best scuba diving). As most travellers know, it’s about strength in numbers in dangerous cities. One person is a target, while two or more people at least give the bad guys pause to consider what they’re about to do. Walking the streets of PNG, I’d want to have a few friends around me. Or a bodyguard.

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Standard mistakes that could kill your start-up

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Give your business a fighting chance by getting things right from the start.Starting a small business can be an exciting, anxiety-provoking, hectic, costly and rewarding exercise. With so much to get your head around, it’s little wonder some important tasks get overlooked.
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Get it right from the ground up

It’s tempting to undertake all the necessary paperwork in-house, to cut out legal and accounting costs.

But Joe Kaleb, chartered accountant and CEO of small business portal www.australianbiz南京夜网.au, says many people focus on cutting costs and don’t consider the benefits of contacting their accountant for advice before embarking on their venture.

“Perhaps the most common and important mistake that business owners make when starting up is that they don’t seek advice early on important matters, such as the appropriate legal structure to operate the business, setting up appropriate systems, the best way of funding the business, having the right insurance policies in place, and having a business plan that is updated on a regular basis,” Kaleb says.

“The consequences of this is that the business owner may end up paying more tax, because, for example, a company was not set up as opposed to running the business as a sole trader … it increases the risk that the business will fail.”

Learn from others’ mistakes

Failing to properly register business and trading names is more common than you’d expect, according to Ben Dalton, senior business facilitator at (Sydney’s) Eastern Suburbs Business Enterprise Centre.

Dalton says the top five mistakes small businesses make when starting out are:

1. Not checking if the preferred trading name has already been registered with ASIC

“Up until recently, business names were regulated separately by each state government. (Therefore) it was possible that the same name would relate to a range of businesses across multiple states,” he says.

“For businesses that are just starting and concentrating on their local market, this might not be a problem, but once they start to expand (especially with a presence on the internet), they could find that they are being confused with an inferior producer – or even worse, other businesses are benefiting from their hard work and good reputation.

“Now that the federal government has taken over regulation, the price has come down and registration is national, so that’s great, but it also means it’s even more important to check first before the domain name is purchased, promotional material is printed and signage paid for.”

2. Businesses that have registered the business name – but fail to check if a trademark has been registered

“Sometimes a business can be in operation for years, and then suddenly gets a ‘cease and desist’ letter as they are infringing someone’s trademark,” he says.

“Often it’s not understood that business name registration is designed to protect consumers, so the operator of a business can easily be tracked down if something goes wrong. A trademark is designed to protect the intellectual property of the business owner. This could include (singly, or in combination) the business name, colour/s, logo, smell – even sounds.”

3. Lack of a five-year plan with milestones to a clear exit strategy

“When I bring this up in the facilitation meetings we hold, people often ask: ‘why would we be discussing the end, when I am only just beginning?’,” says Dalton.

“I reply that, without a clear idea of what all the blood, sweat and tears are for, it will be almost impossible to get through the long days and cold, lonely nights that is the reality of running your own business. The end goal not only has to have a deadline, it also needs to have a number that makes it worthwhile investing five years of your (and your family’s) life.”

4. Trying to appeal to too broad an audience

“We often see people who have a very general product or service, and they often try to appeal to as many different types of customers as possible – simultaneously,” he says.

“This is almost always a mistake. By completing a competitor analysis, they could find out what is going on out there with products that are similar, and then via the ‘5 P’s’ of marketing (product, price, place, promotion and people) (to) identify what their point of difference is. This will then make it easier to identify what target market would find this point of difference attractive. Once they know who the target market is, they can then make it easy for that market to find them.”

5. Why?

“One of the most elemental aspects of starting a business is often the most overlooked, and that is the question of: why? This process begins with (asking yourself): ‘why would anyone start and run this business’, and then leads to ‘why am I starting and running this business?’ If the answer is not clear…then it probably shouldn’t be done.”

Other reasons businesses fail

• Lack of management skills and business experience• Inadequate working capital• Poor marketing• Inadequate market research/poor geographic location• Poor competitor analysis• Poor understanding of relevant laws and regulations that must be complied with• Poor inventory management• Over-investment in fixed assets• Poor sales• The absence of an entrepreneurial orientation

Source: Victorian Employers’ Chamber of Commerce and Industry

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FAIRFAX MEDIA PTY LTD

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Fairfax Media MySmallBusiness Survey 2012
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TERMS AND CONDITIONS

1. Information on how to enter forms part of the terms of entry. Entry into the competition is deemed acceptance of these terms and conditions.

2. The Promotion is a game of skill, and chance plays no part in determining the winners.

3. Entry is open to all residents of Australia. However, employees and their immediate families of Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited, Salmat Digital Pty Limited, and their associated agencies and companies are not eligible to enter.

4. The competition commences on Tuesday 20th November, 2012 at 00:01 (AEDT) and concludes on Tuesday 18th December, 2012 (AEDT).

5. The competition may be advertised on any of Fairfax Media’s affiliated websites and publications including the following:     The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald newspaperThe MySmallBusiness email newsletterMySmallBusiness and BusinessDay solus emailwww.smh南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.theage南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.brisbanetimes南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.watoday南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.canberratimes南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.businessday南京夜网.au/small-business

6. To enter, participants must either:a. Log on to either:www.smh南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.theage南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.brisbanetimes南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.watoday南京夜网.au/small-businesswww.canberratimes南京夜网.au/small-business

And register their details including (but not limited to) first name, last name, email address phone number and answer to the question “please tell us in 25 words or less what suggestions you have for features or functions in MySmallBusiness” to complete their entry.Or;

b. The recipients of the The MySmallBusiness email newsletter and/ or  MySmallBusiness and BusinessDay solus email can click on the Take a survey now link supplied within the email and register their details including (but not limited to) first name, last name, email address , phone number answer to the question “please tell us in 25 words or less what suggestions you have for features or functions in MySmallBusiness” to complete their entry.

7. Entrants under the age of 18 must obtain the prior permission of a parent or guardian over the age of 18 to enter.

8. Incomprehensible and incomplete entries will be deemed invalid.

9. Only one prize per person is permitted.

10. The Promoter reserves the right to request winners to provide proof of identity, proof of residency at the nominated prize delivery address and/or proof of entry validity (including phone bill or store receipt for purchase requirement) in order to claim a prize. Proof of identification, residency and entry considered suitable for verification is at the discretion of the Promoter. In the event that a winner cannot provide suitable proof, the winner will forfeit the prize in whole and no substitute will be offered.

11. The Promoter reserves the right to verify the validity of entries and to disqualify any entry which, in the opinion of the Promoter, includes objectionable content, profanity, potentially insulting, inflammatory or defamatory statements, disqualify any entrant who tampers with the entry process, who submits an entry that is not in accordance with these terms and conditions of entry or who has, in the opinion of the Promoter, engaged in conduct in entering the promotion which is fraudulent, misleading, deceptive or generally damaging to the goodwill or reputation of the promotion and/or the Promoter. The Promoter reserves the right to disqualify a winner if the Promoter becomes aware that the winner and/or the winner’s entry is of a type described in this clause.

12. Entries must be received by 23:59 (AEDT) Tuesday 18th December, 2012. The time of entry will in each case be the time the entry is received by the Promoter. The Promoter accepts no responsibility for any late, lost or misdirected entries not received by the Promoter or delays in the delivery due to technical disruptions, network congestion or delays due to postal service disruptions or for any other reason.

13. The winner will receive One (1) $1,000 ANZ Visa Prepaid Card.

14. Any entry that is made on behalf of an entrant by a third party will be invalid.

15. Total prize value is $1,000 (Including GST)

16. Prizes cannot be transferred or redeemed for cash.

17. Unless expressly stated in these terms and conditions all other expenses (including installation costs) become the responsibility of the winner.

18. If the prize is unavailable, for whatever reason, the Promoter reserves the right to substitute the prize for a prize of equal or greater value, subject to State Regulation.

19. The Promoter reserves the right to refuse to allow a winner to take part in any or all aspects of the prize, if the Promoter determines, in their absolute discretion, that a winner is not in the mental or physical condition necessary to be able to safely participate in the prize.  It is a condition of accepting the prize that the winner may be required to sign a legal release in a form determined by the Promoter in its absolute discretion.

20. Once prizes have left the Promoter’s premises, the Promoter takes no responsibility for prizes damaged, delayed or lost in transit.

21. By accepting the prize, the winner agrees to participate in and co-operate as required with all reasonable media editorial requests relating to the prize, including but not limited to, being interviewed and photographed, filmed and/or chaperoned throughout the duration of the prize.

22. In consideration for the Promoter awarding the prize to the winner, the winner hereby assigns to the Promoter all right, title and interest in and to all copyright in any material created pursuant to the winner’s participation in any aspect of the prize (Works). The winner acknowledges that the Promoter is free to use the Works and to exercise its rights in relation thereto and the winner will not be entitled to any fee for such use.

23. In consideration for the Promoter awarding the prize to the winner, the winner hereby permits the winner’s image and/or voice, as recorded, photographed or filmed during the winner’s participation in the prize to appear in connection Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited or the advertising or marketing thereof, in any media whatsoever throughout the world and the winner will not be entitled to any fee for such use.

24. In the event that for any reason whatsoever a winner does not take an element of the prize at the time stipulated by the Promoter then that element of the prize will be forfeited by the winner and cash will not be awarded in lieu of that element of the prize.

25. Prize values are based upon the recommended retail prices at the time of printing (inclusive of GST). The Promoter accepts no responsibility for change in prize value between now and the ultimate prize redemption date.

26. Independent financial advice should be sought as tax implications may arise as a result of accepting the prize.

27. If the competition winner is under 18 years of age, the prize will be awarded to the winner’s parent or legal guardian.

28. Each valid entrant who has entered the competition over the duration of the promotional period will be judged based on their answer to the entry question.  One valid entrant, who in the sole opinion of the judging panel, has submitted the most creative entry will be selected to become the winner. The prize determination will take place at Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited, of Level 3, 1 Darling Island Road, Pyrmont, NSW, 2009, on Thursday 20th December, 2012 at 10:00 (AEDT).

29. If any particular prize determination is scheduled on a public holiday, the prize determination will be conducted on the following business day.

30. The winners will be notified within 2 days of the prize determination. The winners will be notified of their prize in writing.

31. Prizes will be awarded to person named in the entry. However, in a dispute, will be awarded to the account holder of the entry mechanism used to submit their entry (i.e. mobile phone account holder or land line account holder).

32. Should an entrant’s contact details change during the promotional period, it is the entrant’s responsibility to notify the Promoter. A request to access or modify any information provided in an entry should be directed to Promoter.

33. All reasonable attempts will be made to contact the Winners. If a prize remains unclaimed by a winner or unallocated or forfeited for any reason, by 9:00 (AEDT) on Wednesday 20th March, 2013, the prizes will be re-allocated to the entrant that has submitted the entry which best meets the judging criteria excluding the entrant that has failed to claim the prize.  This unclaimed prize determination will take place at Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited, of Level 3, 1 Darling Island Road, Pyrmont, NSW, 2009 on Wednesday 20th March 2013 at 10:00 (AEDT). The winners will be notified within 2 days of the prize determination.

34. The Promoter’s decision is final and the Promoter will not enter into correspondence regarding the Competition result.

35. It is a condition of accepting the prize that the winner must comply with all the conditions of use of the prize and the prize supplier’s requirements.

36. It is a condition of accepting the prize that the winner may be required to sign a legal release in a form determined by the Promoter in its absolute discretion.

37. In the case of the intervention of any outside act, agent or event which prevents or significantly hinders the Promoter’s ability to proceed with the competition on the dates and in the manner described in these terms and conditions, including but not limited to vandalism, power failures, tempests, natural disasters, acts of God, civil unrest, strike, war, act of terrorism, the Promoter may in its absolute discretion cancel the competition and recommence it from the start on the same conditions, subject to any written directions given under State Regulation.

38. The Promoter shall not be liable for any loss or damage whatsoever which is suffered (including but not limited to indirect or consequential loss) or for any personal injury suffered or sustained in connection with any prize/s except for any liability which cannot be excluded by law. The Promoter is not responsible for any incorrect or inaccurate information, either caused by the phone user or for any of the equipment or programming associated with or utilised in this competition, or for any technical error, or any combination thereof that may occur in the course of the administration of this competition including any omission, interruption, deletion, defect, delay in operation or transmission, communications line or telephone, mobile or satellite network failure, theft or destruction or unauthorised access to or alteration of entries.

39. The Promoter reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual who the Promoter has reason to believe has breached any of these conditions, or engaged in any unlawful or other improper misconduct calculated to jeopardise the fair and proper conduct of the promotion. The Promoter’s legal rights to recover damages or other compensation from such an offender are reserved.

40. Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited, Salmat Digital Pty Limited and their associated agencies and companies assume no responsibility for any error, omission, interruption, deletion, defect, delay in operation or transmission, communications line failure, theft or destruction or unauthorised access to, or alteration of entries, and reserves the right to take any action that may be available.

41. If for any reason this competition is not capable of running as planned, including due to infection by computer virus, bugs, tampering, unauthorised intervention, fraud, technical failures or any causes beyond the control of the Promoter, which corrupt or affect the administration, security, fairness or integrity or proper conduct of this promotion, the Promoter reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry process, take any action that may be available, and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the competition, subject to any written direction given under State Regulation.

42. All entries become the property of the Promoter. The Promoter collects personal information about you to enable you to participate in this promotion but no further use of this information will be made without prior consent.

43. Salmat Digital Pty Limited, on behalf of Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited is collecting the entrant’s personal information for the purpose of conducting and promoting this competition (including but not limited to determining and notifying winner). The entrant’s personal information may be disclosed to Salmat Digital Pty Limited for this purpose. If you are not willing for this to occur you cannot participate in the promotion.

44. Entrants’ personal information may be disclosed to State and Territory lottery departments and winners’ names published as required under the relevant lottery legislation. For purposes of public statements and advertisements the Promoter will only publish the winner’s surname, initial and state. A request to access, update or correct any information should be directed to the Promoter.

45. The Promoter is Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited, ((ABN: 33 003 357 720) of Level 3, 1 Darling Island Road, Pyrmont, NSW, 2009.

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Pyne backs calls to end secrecy of confession

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Senior federal Liberal frontbencher Christopher Pyne has declared that priests should report child sex abuse crimes revealed in the confessional to police.
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On Wednesday, Mr Pyne – who is a practising Catholic – said that as a member of Parliament, it would be wrong of him to advise citizens not to report crimes, particularly something as serious as child abuse.

”If a priest, or anyone else, is aware of the sexual abuse of children that is going on, I think there is an obligation on them to report it to the appropriate authorities,” he told ABC Radio.

On Tuesday, in the wake of Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s announcement of a royal commission on child abuse, Cardinal George Pell said that the seal of confession was ”inviolable”.

Mr Pell said that if a priest knew what would be confessed prior to the confession, then they should refuse to hear it.

Attorney-General Nicola Roxon said on Wednesday that it was important that she did not have a position on particular issues that were going before the commission.

“We really want the commissioners appointed to be able to explore every issue that they feel they need to,” she told ABC TV.

But she also said that the commission needed to look at institutional barriers to reporting child sexual abuse, noting that it was a crime.

“I think the whole community finds that idea [that priests would not report abuse] really abhorrent and we’ve been through these debates for mandatory reporting for doctors, teachers, for others that [are] meant to be in close relationships and nevertheless have been required to make reports, so I think we really need to look carefully, there aren’t a different set of rules that apply.”

Ms Roxon added that it wasn’t just priests who didn’t report but other adults in other school or institutional communities. “A lot of people knew and somehow the system still failed those children,” she said.

On ABC Radio, she cautioned that the royal commission would take “years, not weeks or months”.

Ms Roxon said that when the terms of reference were set later this year, there should be “proper report-back”, so the public could be updated along the way.

Cabinet Minister Bill Shorten has said the royal commission must address the controversial issue of whether priests should be legally compelled to report evidence of abuse they hear in the confessional.

Mr Shorten, who strongly urges a general system of mandatory reporting, said: ”What immunity can you claim when it comes to the safety and protection of little children?

”When it comes to the abuse of children, that privilege, if it ever had validity, is well and truly exhausted.”

New South Wales Premier Barry O’Farrell, a Catholic, has also questioned confessional privilege. He said he struggled to understand how, ”[If] a priest confesses to another priest that he has been involved in paedophile activities, that that information should not be brought to police.”

Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu supported mandatory reporting but said there had been ”a separate issue” about the confessional. This would be looked at by the Victorian inquiry into abuse and he expected it would be raised through the commission.

Mr Shorten said Victoria police supported mandatory reporting and state law should be changed to bring it in. Police should not be obstructed by institutions failing to report matters, and it was important institutions understood that internal processes were no substitute for police investigation.

Mr Shorten said his own strong views had been influenced by the fact his family had for years attended the Sacred Heart parish in Oakleigh, served by notorious paedophile priest Kevin O’Donnell. He said thousands of Australians had been victims of sexual abuse, ”and too many haven’t received a real apology, atonement or recompense”.

■The Prime Minister’s Department said those wanting their details passed on to the commission’s secretariat could phone 1800 099 340.

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Single-parent families could lose all income in January

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Single parents affected by the federal government’s changes to welfare payments face being left without any income on January 1 because many do not realise they will have to reapply for their new payments.
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Changes announced in the May budget mean about 150,000 parents will no longer be paid the sole parent payment but will instead receive the dole when their youngest child turns eight, a drop in income of between $60 and $110 a week.

Welfare groups say people affected by the changes believe their payments will be automatically adjusted instead of having to reapply for the dole, or Newstart Allowance.

”It is deeply disturbing to find that single-parent families may be left without any income when the new rules start on January 1 next year,” the president of the National Welfare Rights Network, Maree O’Halloran, said.

”Those parents who have not heard the bad news will not have made a new claim for the Newstart Allowance.”

The change, which angered many Labor MPs, is budgeted to save the government more than $700 million over the next four years.

Ms O’Halloran said it was ”unacceptable” that families could be left without any government payments because they did not know they would have to complete additional paperwork.

”The legislation does not help parents find more hours of paid work and these are the families that can least afford cuts,” Ms O’Halloran said.

Minister for Human Services Kim Carr said 300 Centrelink staff had been trained to make sure people affected by the changes were contacted in advance of the January 1 changeover.

”For many people, everything will be explained and organised for them in just one phone call,” Senator Carr said.

The department is meeting welfare and church groups as part of its attempts to reach people affected by the changes.

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First drive review: Audi A3 Sportback

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Audi’s new A3 Sportback owes plenty to the new Volkswagen Golf that goes on sale here early in 2013.
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That may sound harsh for a car that will go up against big name rivals like the BMW 1-Series and incoming Mercedes-Benz A-Class. But it’s true.

Audi’s parent company, Volkswagen, has introduced its new modular platform system (known internally as MQB), which sees the new Audi A3 Sportback being built off the same underpinnings as the due-in-2013 Golf, among other cars such as the upcoming Skoda Rapid.

In fact, there will be dozens of different models built from the same basic architecture, something car makers around the world are increasingly looking at.

That said, you wouldn’t be able tell the more humble underpinnings from looking at the new Audi A3 Sportback.

At first glance it looks a lot like almost every other Audi in the range, particularly inside.

Upon closer inspection, there are some notable changes such as clearer instrumentation on the dash dials, LED lights for the fuel and temperature gauges, and new-look air vents that give the A3 a genuinely sporty flavour.

While there may be common components underneath, Audi has done an impressive job of differentiating the A3 with a high quality interior that has a character of its own.

The ventilation controls are also better, with a separate fan switch meaning you won’t have to siphon through menus to adjust the blower.

Audi’s revised MMI (multimedia interface) system now includes the Audi Connect system. It’s a revelation in staying connected in your car, as you can use a dedicated SIM card to update your Facebook, check customised online news feeds, update your Twitter account and even compose text messages via voice command. While it’s not perfect, our first impression is that it appears to work better than Apple’s Siri voice recognition system.

Another big bonus of this system is that it acts as a Wi-Fi hotspot for your car, with capability for up to eight devices to be connected.

You can also use the A3’s satellite-navigation system to search nearby points of interest via Google, and the satnav also displays its graphics using Google Earth.

The downside is that the system will chew through your data allowance. Considering the comparatively high prices for data in Australia, it could be something you’d end up using sparingly – allowing the kids to update their Facebook and watch YouTube could add up to a nasty bill.

The rest of the MMI system is controlled via Audi’s touch-sensitive dial. It allows you to “write” in commands, and the dial system can help you navigate through the various menus quite easily.

Audi has also added new mini toggle switches near the MMI dial, which make it easier to switch between the satnav, radio and media screens. It’s a minor change but makes for a big improvement.

In terms of space, the A3 Sportback benefits from a longer wheelbase (the space between the front and rear wheels), which liberates some extra knee room and makes it feel bigger inside than its exterior dimensions perhaps suggest it should.

Storage is good through the cabin, and the boot is decent at 380 litres (1220L with the rear seats folded flat). And, in good news for back-seat passengers subject to summer road trips, every A3 Sportback has standard rear air vents.

We tested three different engine variants of the new A3 Sportback.

The first was the 2.0-litre turbo diesel (2.0TDI), which has seen a power bump over the current model to 110kW/320Nm (previously 103kW). It’s a punchy engine with good low-rev urge, and its claimed European cycle fuel consumption is just 4.2L/100km.

The model we tested was a six-speed manual, which offered buttery smooth shifts and a well-weighted clutch.

The 2.0 TDI drove well, with good road holding, competent steering and a comfortable – if firm – ride. We’ll reserve our overall judgment until we drive it in Australia.

The next version we tested was the 1.8 TFSI automatic, which is currently the highest-selling variant in Australia.

Power comes from a 1.8-litre turbocharged four-cylinder pushing out an oomphy 132kW and 250Nm, which sends its power to all four wheels via Audi’s S-Tronic six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission (Australian versions are expected to be front-drive only).

This variant was somewhat of a disappointment. The engine didn’t feel as spritely as we remembered, possibly because of the extra weight of the all-wheel-drive system.

And then there was the transmission. Rather than the lightning-quick shifts most dual-clutch units offer, our car had significant lag moments between shifts, and it also hesitated at low speeds, lurching and lunging as we crawled in afternoon traffic. Even manual mode didn’t help.

The last car of the day, though, was the highlight.

The 1.4 TFSI CoD with cylinder deactivation technology allows the car’s turbocharged engine to run on either two or four cylinders, depending on the situation. Power outputs for this engine are rated at 103kW/250Nm, and fuel consumption is a miserly 4.8L/100km.

We tried it both with a manual and the dual-clutch auto, and it was the latter that stood out as the pick.

The engine swaps between two and four cylinders at will, with the change barely perceptible unless you listen for the mild chortle-like engine sound when it’s running on fewer cylinders (and watch for the indicator on the dashboard instrumentation).

Even when it is operating as such, the engine has a free-willed nature, revving without hassle and swapping back and forth effortlessly.

Audi Australia says it hopes to bring the 1.4 TFSI CoD to Australia as part of the launch line-up in April 2013, possibly as the base model in the range.

However, the company says nothing has been confirmed, and the high-tech engine may instead be dismissed in favour of the less technologically advanced 1.4 TFSI with 90kW/200Nm.

Interestingly, Volkswagen is believed to be considering the cylinder deactivation engine for the Golf.

See, it and the A3 really are closer than ever before. Like Drive南京夜网.au on Facebook Follow Drive南京夜网.au on Twitter @Drivecomau

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Another NSW home builder collapses

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The woes of the building sector are showing no signs of easing, with another privately owned NSW-based home construction company collapsing.
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Hall Chadwick was yesterday appointed voluntary administrator of Holmwood Builders, which has turnover estimated at $40 million. It trades as Procorp.

The Procorp group has 50 employees, 500 creditors and offices in Sydney, Newcastle, the South Coast and Albury.

Hall Chadwick is conducting an “urgent assessment” of Procorp’s business affairs with a view to releasing a report to creditors in about a week, Hall Chadwick partner Domenic Calabretta said.

The administrator was trying to work out “who are the creditors, customers and employees”.

“Further detailed information will be provided to creditors in the next few weeks regarding the administrators’ recommendation as to the future of Procorp,” Mr Calabretta said.

The Australian and Securities & Investment Commission statistics had so far this year recorded the most insolvency appointments since the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, he said.

NSW topped the list of Australian states for insolvency appointments this year, Mr Calabretta said.

The construction industry has been hit hardest, with key players such as Kell & Rigby and Southern Cross collapsing.

This would lead to further pain for service providers and subcontractors who had lost big sums of money in large corporate failures, Mr Calabretta said.

NSW Fair Trading Minister Anthony Roberts said every support would be offered to consumers affected by the collapse.

The exact number of homes under construction was still being determined but Fair Trading understands between 80 and 100 dwellings across Sydney, the Hunter, South Coast and Riverina could be affected, Mr Roberts said.

Fair Trading is in contact with the Administrator and the Home Warranty Insurance Fund.

“Fair Trading is ready to respond and assist the affected consumers while also working with the administrators and insurer to determine the best options for all parties as quickly as possible,” Mr Roberts said.

“Home buyers should have been given a Home Warranty Insurance Certificate by Holmwood Builders Pty Ltd shortly after they entered into the building contract and that certificate will identify their insurer,” Mr Roberts said. “Consumers who have signed a contract with Holmwood Builders are advised to contact the insurer immediately.

“Any subcontractor or supplier who believes they are owed money by the companies should lodge a proof of debt, along with supporting documentation, to the administrator,” Mr Roberts said.

Newcastle Herald

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Statement from Bishop Bill Wright 

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As Bishop of Maitland-Newcastle, I have been asked to comment on matters surrounding a historic complaint of sexual harassment by Fr Terry Sylvester, a deceased priest of this diocese, against another adult.
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I have no first-hand knowledge of this matter, and I am unacquainted with any of the persons principally involved, but the following information has been derived from records held by the diocese.

As I understand it, the Newcastle Herald is asking me to comment in regard to a situation involving a person who has not given consent to the journalist for their story to be told to the public.

I have asked the Herald to provide the person’s consent, which would allow me to have a full and honest discussion of the events, but to date the only response I have been given is the suggestion that I am trying to hide behind privacy laws.

I acknowledge that news media have a vital role in informing the public. The diocese, however, is morally and legally constrained to protect an individual’s right to privacy. It is my hope that in my attempts to provideThe Herald with a sufficient response which in no way identifies the person involved, neither my comments nor The Herald’s planned article will cause any distress to any persons involved in these matters.

The diocese can confirm that an investigation was conducted into a complaint against Fr Sylvester. That investigation occurred in 1998 directly after the complaint was made under the then recently introduced Towards Healing protocols.

The complaint related to a pattern of verbal harassment and a single incident of physical harassment of a sexual nature, by Fr Sylvester, against an adult person that was alleged to have occurred in the late 1970s.

Through the NSW Professional Standards Office, an independent Sydney firm was engaged to investigate the allegation and submitted its report in July 1998.

The report found “There is no evidence at this stage to prove or disprove the allegations made.” The report also recommended that “Since abusive behaviour cannot, at this stage, be proved removal of Fr Sylvester from the ministry is not justified.”

After a period during which the diocese continued to have contact with and support the person who made the complaint, that person requested a review of the original investigation.

Michael Malone, then Bishop of Maitland-Newcastle agreed to this and in 2001 a second independent Sydney firm was engaged through the Professional Standards Office to review the original investigative process.

The review was completed in mid 2001 and it highlighted concerns that the incorrect burden of proof may have been used, in effect the criminal standard rather than the civil one. Based on the findings of this review, the same firm was engaged to conduct further inquiries and to produce a second report.

The second investigation report, submitted in mid 2002, concluded that the complaint against Fr Sylvester was sustained on the balance of probabilities.

The diocese has no records of any earlier allegations made against Fr Sylvester. For the sake of full disclosure I will say that the person who made the complaint against Fr Sylvester reported a rumour that there were two other persons who had cause for complaint against Fr Sylvester. Both the first and second investigations made all possible efforts to pursue this lead.However neither investigation was able to find any other person who wished to bring forward a complaint.

A Newcastle Herald article of 25 September 2012, claimed that there are two other alleged victims of Fr Sylvester. It must be noted that whilst no names were mentioned, the two women in the article did give consent to the journalist for their story to be told. Until that report, however, the diocese was unaware of these persons.

One of them, we now know, received counselling and support from a diocesan priest who, as the Newcastle Herald has acknowledged, encouraged that person to report their allegations and seek help but that person chose not to do so and directed the priest to maintain the person’s confidentiality.

The reality is that it was accepted practice for professionals and people in helping vocations to respect the wishes of adults in regard to confidentiality. In the light of subsequent experience, however, and since such practice can be construed by some as the church’s own decision to ‘cover-up’ abuse, I can confirm that it is now the policy and practice of the diocese to report all such allegations of abuse to Police, even when the victims are not prepared to take the matter to Police themselves.

I have met with a number of people who were abused by members of the diocese and I have sincerely expressed to them, as a man and as Bishop of Maitland-Newcastle, my profound sorrow and regret that their innocence was lost and that those responsible to care and protect failed in their duty.

Through Zimmerman Services, the diocese has specialist support and assistance available to anybody who has been harmed by a member of the diocese, whether as a child or an adult as in this case and we remain ready to listen and to support them and their families.

If the two women from The Newcastle Herald article of 25 September 2012 wish to have contact with the diocese, I and the specialist staff at Zimmerman Services would be pleased to meet with them individually or together, with appropriate support people of their choice present and at an appropriate location of their choice.

Indeed, the diocese continues to publicise its services and extends an open invitation but it does not have the right, nor would it try, to push its assistance upon anyone who does not wish it.

I believe the diocese undertook a thorough investigation of the allegations made by the person. The diocese engaged two independent firms to undertake rigorous investigative processes.

All reasonable endeavours were used to collect the available evidence in relation to the allegation and to obtain information from other persons who might have had knowledge in relation to Fr Sylvester or the person who made the complaint.

The diocese may be criticised for not removing Fr Sylvester from ministry when the complaint against him was sustained in June 2002, as a punitive measure and one which might have afforded some consolation to his victim.

Today, ten years later, further action would be taken in regard to Fr Sylvester.

The other view, which must have prevailed in 2002, would be that his continuance in ministry posed no likely risk to anyone, as the only known allegation against him related to matters that occurred 26 years previously and he was now aged 73.

He reached retirement age two years later and died six months after that.

I am sincerely sorry that the person who made the complaint, and the two others of whom we are now aware, was harassed or abused by a priest of this diocese.Disrespectful or abusive behaviour is simply never acceptable, whether it’s between adults, as it was in this matter, or between adults and children.

Although it took two investigations to establish the truth, I am grateful that Bishop Malone was prepared to pursue the matter further when doubts were raised about the initial investigation.

Australia and U.S. hold bilateral meetings

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Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meet during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images Australian Minister for Defense Stephen Smith, US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr pose for a photo during a dinner at the Matilda Bay Restaurant prior to the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, in Perth, Australia.Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images
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Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greet each other in the bar of the Hyatt Hotel prior to the Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr chat during a dinner at the Matilda Bay Restaurant prior to the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attend a dinner at the Matilda Bay Restaurant prior to the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attend a dinner at the Matilda Bay Restaurant prior to the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, on November 13, 2012 in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

Australian Minister for Defense Stephen Smith, US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr pose with guests at a dinner at the Matilda Bay Restaurant prior to the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attend a dinner at the Matilda Bay Restaurant prior to the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations, in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attend the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel , on November 13, 2012 in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greet each other in the bar of the Hyatt Hotel prior to the Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta share a joke during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images

The Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard and the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton enjoy afternoon tea during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty-Pool/Getty Images

The Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard and the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton enjoy afternoon tea during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty-Pool/Getty Images

The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta meet during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty-Pool/Getty Images

The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Australian Minister for Defense Stephen Smith pose for a photo during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty-Pool/Getty Images

The Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard walks with the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton upon arrival for afternoon tea during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty-Pool/Getty Images

Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Bob Carr, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta share a joke during the annual Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations at the Hyatt Hotel in Perth, Australia. Photo by Colin Murty – Pool Getty Images